Feature Image Credit: @booksnbikram

To the average American, the Good Morning America show is a staple in our world. The show gives us the day’s top headlines and in-depth inspiration for living a better life. As one of the most popular morning shows, it’s only reasonable that the Times Square talk show start a book club. In honor of the incredible and thriving show that many generations have grown up watching, and the magnificent books that exist and have been chosen, we have rounded up every GMA Book Club Pick and want to share with you what America is reading!

Dava Shastri’s Last Day by Kirthana Ramisetti

At the age of seventy, one of the world’s wealthiest women is diagnosed with cancer. Dava Shastri’s decides to handle it like everything else in her life, taking death into her own hands. She invites her children to her private island and informs them that she is releasing her death early so she can read her obituaries. As someone who dedicated her life to the arts and the empowerment of women, Dava expects to read articles lauding her philanthropic work. Instead, her “death” reveals two devastating secrets, and now everyone knows including her children. She must come to terms with the decisions of the past and make right the little future she has left.

Still Life by Sarah Winman

This story travels across decades and countries for the triumph and heartbreak of love and war. Ulysses Temper is a young English soldier who has a chance encounter with Evelyn Skinner in a wine cellar. Evelyn is an art historian who is trying to find the meaning behind ruin and memories of not only the middle ages but in her own youth. As Allied troops are advancing and bombs are falling, Ulysses and Evelyn find themselves in the rubble of war-torn Italy, shaping their lives for what will be the next four decades.

We Are Not Like Them by Christine Pride and Jo Piazza

In a story of race and friendship, Jen and Riley have grown up as best friends but are more like sisters, despite their lives going in different directions. Jen got married young and had a family, Riley pursued her childhood dream of becoming a television journalist and is poised to become one of the first Black female anchors of the top news channel in their hometown of Philadelphia. But when Jen’s husband, a city police officer, is involved in the shooting of an unarmed Black teenager, their friendship is put to the test. Riley is given the chance for this career-making story, but she wrestles with the implications of this tragic incident for her Black community, her ambitions, and her relationship with her lifelong friend. Will their long-lasting friendship endure through love or will a deeply divided world separate the two?

Several People Are Typing by Calvin Kasulke

Told primarily through Slack channel messages, Several People Are Typing follows a New York-based public relations firm as they adapt to virtual working, dealing with a PR crisis with their huge dog food client, and even more random crises that the employees face in their everyday lives. When mid-level employee Gerald’s consciousness gets uploaded into the Slack channels, everyone thinks it is a joke until his productivity levels skyrocket. He tries to get his friend Pradeep to help him out of his disembodied state, but as his colleagues deal with their PR crises, Gerald becomes more comfortable with his new reality.

The Husbands by Chandler Baker

Successful attorney Nora Spangler is struggling domestically, feeling as if she does all the work at home while her husband offers to do nothing. When she and her husband consider moving into Dynasty Ranch, they find that all of the wives in this neighborhood are highly successful with doting, helpful husbands. Soon, she finds herself slowly be pulled into these women’s lives as she assists with a resident’s wrongful death case. While working, she can’t help herself from wanting to figure out how these women succeed in life—and if it is worth killing for?

The Personal Librarian by Marie Benedict

Soon after young Belle de Costa Green is hired by J.P. Morgan as his personal librarian, she is thrown into elite New York and is soon viewed as one of the most powerful people in the book and art world. However, Belle must navigate this world with the secret of her family and that she is the daughter of well-known equality activist and first Black graduate of Harvard, Richard Greener. This novel shares the extraordinary life of Belle in a new light and how she navigated life as a passing white woman.

The Other Black Girl by Zakiya Dalia Harris

As the only Black employee at Wagner Books, Nella Rogers faces constant isolation and microaggression in the workplace. When she finds out that Hazel, a new Black editorial assistant is hired, Nella is overjoyed to have someone to relate and talk to. Soon, Hazel is an office favorite and leaves Nella far behind without explanation. When threatening notes start appearing on Nella’s desk, warning her to leave immediately, Nella assumes that Hazel has left them behind—but soon realizes that there may be more at stake than her job.

Olympus, Texas by Stacey Swann

The Briscoe family has always been the talk of small-town Olympia, between June’s husband having affairs with multiple women and fathering three children outside of their marriage with three children of their own. Once again, the Briscoe family takes the spotlight as another affair has taken place—but this time June’s son, March, has returned home after having an affair with his brother’s wife. Soon after March arrives at the family home, someone is dead, marriages are shattered, and strong bonds are quickly broken. This story weaves classical mythology into present story to express the complexities of family and love.

Of Women and Salt by Gabriela Garcia

Following three generations of Cuban women, Gabriela Garcia’s intricately told novel revolves around the emotional trauma of displacement for all those involved, discovering your roots, the battle with addiction, and the importance of family. When Jeanette’s neighbors are detained by ICE, she decides to take in their child and soon becomes motivated to learn more about her family’s complex history. She reaches out to her distraught mother as well as her grandmother who lives in Cuba. In a story told between the 19th century to the present day, Jeanette discovers the traumas, strengths and difficulties that the women in her family faced.

Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro

Soon in the distant future, technology has slowly taken over and assists humans with their everyday lives. One example of this fascinated technology is an Artificial Friend, a humanoid that serves as a companion for children. The story is told through the perspective of an AF named Klara, who spends her time observing the world and humans from the inside of a store display. Once she is picked by Josie, a 14-year-old with a mysterious illness, Klara slowly starts to understand life, love and what it means to be human.

How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps Her House by Cherie Jones

Lala has grown up with a story her grandmother shared about a one-armed sister, meant to serve as a cautionary tale to inspire daughters to listen to their mothers and never disobey. Years pass and Lala finds herself pregnant and married to a criminal. She spends her days braiding tourists’ hair at Baxter’s Beach, Barbados until one of her husband’s robberies goes terribly wrong. This story alternates perspectives between characters, exploring race, class, abuse and motherhood.

The Push by Ashley Audrain

More than anything, Blythe Connor wants to be the perfect mother she never had for her new child Violet, but soon finds this difficult. Violet acts differently than most children, but it seems as if Blythe is the only one that notices, causing her to question her own sanity. When her second child is born, Blythe and the rest of her family connect with her new son right away, reassuring Blythe. Is Blythe correct in her suspicions about her children—or is she just the same as her mother, or is it all in her head?

This Time Next Year by Sophie Cousens

Minnie Cooper is convinced that Quinn Hamilton, a man she has never met, is the reason why all of her New Year’s birthdays get progressively worse each year. Her evidence behind this claim is that he was born minutes before her in the same hospital thirty years prior, receiving the cash prize and also stole the name she was meant to have. When she finally bumps into him unplanned on their shared birthday, she can’t help to see that life favors him more since he is a successful businessman with a perfect girlfriend, while she is a struggling baker. The two find themselves bumping into each other more and find that they can’t help but be more attracted to each other every time.

Memorial by Bryan Washington

Mike, a Japanese American chef, and Benson, a Black daycare worker, have been dating and living with each other for years, but are now asking, “Why?” They love each other, but can’t seem to find that connection that they are both looking for. When Mike finds out this his estranged father is dying in Osaka, he travels across the world to say goodbye as his mother comes into town and becomes Benson’s temporary roommate. The two men take this time apart to explore themselves, their past, and what they want personally, as well as for each other.

The Midnight Library by Matt Haig

Nora Seed wakes up and finds herself in the Midnight Library, a place set in between life and death. Within the shelves contain a multitude of books, each containing various ways that your life could have gone if you made a different choice. Once there, Nora has the opportunity to choose a new way of life, whether it be a different career, living childhood dreams, dating different people, and more. However, she soon finds herself in trouble, must find a way to save herself, and eventually must figure out for herself what makes a fulfilling life.

Fifty Words for Rain by Asha Lemmie

As the illegitimate daughter of a Japanese aristocrat and her African American GI lover, Nori has grown up hidden in the attic of her grandparents’ imperial estate, forced to endure chemical baths to lighten her skin. She has learned to never resist or question, but when she gets a chance to meet her half-brother, Akira, the two form a powerful bond that her grandparents disapprove of. Nori has now taken a glimpse into the life that she is forbidden from having and is determined to fight to be a part of it, not matter the cost.

The Lions of Fifth Avenue by Fiona Davis

Laura Lyons seems to have it all: a husband with an amazing job as the superintendent for the New York Public Library, two beautiful children, and a great home. However, Laura wants more and applies for the Columbia Journalism School, soon finding herself wrapped up in a radical all-female group, the Heterodoxy Club. This club soon has her questioning her current life, but she must confront her shifting priorities when books are stolen from the library. Eighty years later, her granddaughter Sadie is working as a curator at the New York Library and finds herself in trouble once rare items from the library have been stolen, forcing her to face her family’s legacy.

Sex and Vanity by Kevin Kwan

When in Capri for a destination wedding, Luci Churchill meets George Zao for the first time and immediately decides that she doesn’t like him. She hates how carefree he seems, how he offered to switch rooms with her so she could get a better view—but she especially hates how her cousin found them kissing. Years pass and Luci sees George again while on a trip with her new fiancée, and can’t help but find herself being drawn to him. Luci, who already struggles with accepting her Asian heritage, finds herself struggling to stop herself from falling in love with George and wreaking havoc within her family.

The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

Sixteen-year-old twins Desiree and Stella run away from their small town in order to find their own destinies with the goal to stick together. After a while on their own, Stella leaves Desiree to find her own path and the two grow apart. As the years pass, Desiree comes back home with a daughter, while Stella lives her life as a passing white woman with a white husband. Their lives soon become intertwined again as their daughters cross paths and face their own share of growing up, life decisions, race, and familial expectations.

Oona Out of Order by Margarita Montimore

Oona Lockhart cannot wait for the clock to strike midnight during New Year’s Eve 1982, when she will turn nineteen and has a whole world of possibilities in front of her. She still has yet to make a decision on whether or not to stay in Brooklyn to be with her boyfriend and pursue music or travel to London to study economics, but she doesn’t get a chance to make this decision before she faints before midnight and wakes up thirty-two years in the future. From then on, Oona will hop from one age to another every year and finds herself on a path of self-discovery.

The Book of V. by Anna Solomon

In 2016, Lily is a mother, a second wife and a woman trying to pursue her career goals in Brooklyn. She struggles to balance her duty to her family, as well as her duty to herself and her dreams in life. Readers then meet Vivian Barr, a senator’s wife in the 1970s who finds herself humiliated by her husband. Lastly, the perspective shifts to Queen Esther and how she used her power to save her people. These three narrative interlap to explore womanhood, sex, power, and how women’s lives have not changed over thousands of years.

In Five Years by Rebecca Serle

Danni Kohan has always been extremely organized, planning her life to the max up, to the tiniest detail. She could never imagine herself living life on a whim without an inkling of a plan to help her navigate. In fact, her way of life has proven to work for her just fine when she lands a dream job interview, and her boyfriend proposes. That night, she falls asleep content with her choices and finds herself waking up in a different apartment and life, five years in the future. When she wakes up again, she starts to reassess how she lives her life and what she could probably do differently, especially since she can’t stop thinking about the different reality she saw.

Long Bright River by Liz Moore

Alternating between the past and present, readers follow policewoman Mickey Fitzpatrick and her relationship with her estranged sister Kacey, who is battling an opioid addiction. Mickey and Kacey both live in a Philadelphia neighborhood that is overtaken by the opioid crisis, and while Mickey goes on her police rounds, she can’t help but constantly worry that the next OD she finds is her sister. When Kacey disappears and seemingly connected murders start to take place, Mickey finds herself on the hunt for the killer and her sister.

Children of Virtue and Vengeance by Tomi Adeyemi

Picking up after the exciting ending of Children of Blood and Bone, Zélie and Amari are successful in bringing back magic to Orïsha but find themselves having to deal with the consequences of doing so. A civil war is starting to form between the maji and the monarchy, and Zélie is fighting to unite the maji under a common cause in order to defeat their enemy. On top of this, she must also fight to keep Amari’s right to the throne valid as the military and monarchy join forces to bring down the maji.

The Family Upstairs by Lisa Jewell

One day, Libby Jones comes home to find a letter waiting for her, one that changes the current path of her life forever. She soon discovers that she is the inheritor of her birth parents’ abandoned mansion and that when she was a baby, she was put up for adoption after authorities found her alone in a home with three dead bodies while her four other siblings were declared missing.  Libby decides to discover more about her family’s past and parents’ terrifying death, but little does she know that some of her family are waiting at the house for her.

Dominicana by Angie Cruz

When Ana Cancion was just fifteen years old, she married Juan Ruiz, a man twice her age, for an opportunity for her family to immigrate to America, even if there was no love between the two. Ever since their marriage, Ana spends her days in New York miserable and starts to plan her escape. But when she begins to leave, Juan’s younger brother Cesar convinces her to stay. Eventually, Juan leaves to travel back to the Dominican Republic to protect his family assets and leaves Cesar to care for Ana. The two form a bond and Ana starts to a see a life that she could truly enjoy, and she finds that she must choose between doing what’s best for her family or for herself.