Judging books by their covers: Numbers

From classics to contemporary, memoir, mystery, nonfiction and self-help, we’ve got your number! From zero to 10, here are some of our favorite books that use numbers in the title. Allow us to present judging books by their covers – the numbers edition.

The Weight of Zero by Karen Fortunati

ZERO: Catherine is dealing with bipolar the only way she knows how – by stockpiling medication in case she needs it all one day. But then her plan gets sidelined when she meets some new friends and starts feeling less isolated. Are things really getting better or is it only a matter of time before Zero – what she has named her depression – comes after her again.


One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey

ONE: In this classic, Randle enters the mental hospital and decides he’s going to run the show. He and the other patients do what they can to aggravate Nurse Ratched. Gambling, women and wine, Randle is defiant in every way. Randle and Ratched become relentless opponents and it’s anyone’s guess who will come out on top.


A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

TWO: A courageous adventure, this is the story of a man wrongly imprisoned for 18 years. When he is released and reunited with his daughter, he only wants peace. But he is summoned to testify against a man accused of treason which culminates in an escape from prison and the threat of the guillotine. Brilliant, dramatic, romantic, A Tale of Two Cities is a classic read.


Three Women by Lisa Taddeo

THREE: Author and journalist Lisa Taddeo immersed herself in investigative storytelling for years to bring us the true stories of three very different women. A homemaker, a teenager and a successful restaurant owner share their deepest secrets and transgressions in Three Women.


The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom by Don Miguel Ruiz 

FOUR: A personal fave, I am trying hard to live by the four agreements in order to feel free and live with less suffering: Be impeccable with your word. Don’t take anything personally. Don’t make assumptions. Always do your best. By implementing this code of conduct, you can live a happier and more genuine life!


Five Days Gone: The Mystery of My Mother’s Disappearance as a Child by Laura Cumming

FIVE: Author Laura Cumming unpacks the mystery of her mother’s disappearance before she was born. Laura’s mother was kidnapped when she was just three years old. Several days later, she resurfaced, perfectly fine. A kidnapper was never found, and Laura’s mother didn’t even know she was the center of a crime until she was 50. What happened to her in those missing days, and what other secrets were kept from her? A blend of memoir and history, the story and secrets about Laura’s mother will captivate.


Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

SIX: It was a tough choice for this numbers edition because essentially, TJR could have landed on this list twice (Shout-out to The SEVEN Husbands of Evelyn Hugo!) But our love for Daisy Jones is strong. If you’re a fan of good music-themed books and great storytelling in a unique format, Daisy Jones & The Six is a read you should not pass up.


Seven Days of Us by Francesca Hornak

SEVEN: When the Birch family is quarantined over Christmas, they are forced to… OMG… spend time together. With unreliable Wi-Fi and a family at odds, this could be the worst holiday ever. As the week progresses, there will be tension, revelations and, oh yes, an unexpected visitor. Get prepared for Seven Days of Us!


Eight Perfect Murders by Peter Swanson

EIGHT: Do you enjoy mysteries? Do you like books centered around unsolved murders? Bookstore owner Malcolm does, so he compiles a list of the most perfect murders. But when an FBI agent comes asking questions about some unsolved killings similar to the ones on Malcolm’s list, he starts to worry that there’s a murderer in his midst and he begins to suspect everyone around him. Shocking twists and more victims will have you glued to Eight Perfect Murders.


Nine Elms by Robert Bryndza

NINE: Although Kate Marshall caught the notorious Nine Elms serial killer, her career ended because of a scandal. Fifteen years later, she lectures at a small coastal university where she’ll face the ghosts of her past when a Nine Elms copycat killer goes on the hunt. Kate will brush up on her investigative skills in hopes of redeeming herself, but this new killer has his sights on Kate in order to complete his personal murder goals.


Ten by Gretchen McNeil

TEN: A fun getaway for a group of teens ends in murder when they are stranded on an island. Meg and Minnie are looking forward to a weekend like no other. And they get that. As a storm hits and the teens are isolated, a killer is on the loose. As more murders occur and teens turn on one another out of fear, it’s only a matter of time before no one is left.

*Disclosure: The links above are affiliate links. These picks are editorially selected, but if you purchase, She Reads may get something in return. We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. 

Stephanie Elliot

Stephanie Elliot writes for a variety of websites and magazines on topics such as parenting, mental health issues, relationships, and of course, books. She is an editor and book reviewer. Stephanie is also the author of the young adult novel, Sad Perfect, which was inspired by her own daughter’s journey with ARFID, Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder. She lives in Scottsdale, Arizona, with her husband and their three children. For more info, visit www.stephanieelliot.com.

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